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Our glorious strawberry generation

the great strawberry generation generation x baby boomers generation y

Opinions

We have what it takes to be greater than any generation before us.

Millennials (1980s-2000s), also known as Generation Y, are often branded as the strawberry generation

Easily bruised like strawberries, we are stereotyped to be unable to withstand social pressure, or work hard like earlier generations. We are negatively perceived to be selfish, spoiled, and lazy at work.  

After all, we were born in an era of economic prosperity, and grew up being overprotected by our parents for a huge chunk of our lives.

It is understandable that a few rotten apples could tarnish our generation, but who is to say that the older generations do not have their own generic inadequacies? 

In our defense, every generation is deemed to be selfish and misunderstood by the older generations. 

So if the older generations - Generation X (1960s-1980s) and the Baby Boomers (1946-1964) think that we are humanity's worst lot, then they are terribly wrong.

strawberry generation
WE MILLENNIALS HAVE OUR STRONG POINTS TOO.

Generation Y's critics claim that we are less hardworking than our parents and grandparents. Although it is true that our generation was born in a period of peace and prosperity, which we take for granted - it does not necessarily mean we are spoiled. 

Consider Maslowe's hierarchy of needs, which argues that humans seek first to satisfy physiological needs such as food, water, and warmth before fulfilling higher needs.

Since millennials were born from relatively prosperous generations with stable careers, they grew up with fewer financial constraints, and seek a level higher in the hierarchy of needs: esteem and self-actualisation. 

the great strawberry generation generation x baby boomers generation y  
MILLENIALS SEEK THE HIGHER LEVELS IN MASLOW'S HEIRARCHY OF NEEDS.
PHOTO CREDIT: WIKIMEDIA.ORG

If you bring that burning desire for self-actualisation into today's context, it essentially produces more passionate and driven individuals who pursue their ambitions, rather than meet the expectations set by older generations to "survive". 

Simply put, we do not see the point in accepting the tedious and uninspiring jobs that our parents and grandparents tolerated.

Next, millennials are known to be very resourceful and IT savvy; no surprise there thanks to being born in a world brimming with advanced technology. While the older generations use new technology to do old and familiar tasks, we use the same technology to explore different possibilities in a wide range of areas. 

the great strawberry generation generation x baby boomers generation y  
OUR EXPERT USE OF TECHNOLOGY IS SECOND TO NONE.

Moreover, our parents relied mostly on formal education in schools to grasp knowledge, but we supplement it with endless sources of information – readily available on the Internet. 

Basically, we have the power to learn anything from anywhere because of our affinity with technology.

In the grand scheme of things, taking advice from the older generations would do a lot of good for us. While we have our own strengths that set us apart from them, those generations were characterised by their incredible hard work, patience, and pragmatism.

Should we embody those values and apply them to our strengths – converting idealism into active passion and making full use of the technology at our disposal – we can reach colossal heights beyond any generation before us.

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