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Building up a goodbye to 2016

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2016 will not just take people away, it'll take away these places too.

Tanjong Pagar Centre has taken our Singapore skyline to new heights.

Standing at a staggering 290 metres, the new 64-storey business centre is roughly 10 metres taller than Republic Plaza, United Overseas Bank Plaza One, and One Raffles Place, which are some of the tallest buildings in Singapore at 280 metres.

While it may be considered the peak of our architectural year, let's not forget the buildings that will not be following us into the new year.

Here are the four buildings you won't be able to see in 2017.

1. Dakota Crescent

Known for its iconic Dove playground and local café Tian Kee & Co., many hipsters and photographers (myself included) go to Dakota Crescent just to enjoy a slice of rainbow cake and a side of tranquility in one of Singapore's oldest estates.

The quaint estate was called up for redevelopment earlier last year, and residents living in the 17 blocks were given till the end of this year to move out.

While the mosquitoes may bite, this playground is still loads of fun
THE ONLY 'DOVE' PLAYGROUND LEFT IN SINGAPORE,
THIS IS A PIECE OF HISTORY MANY OF US ARE GOING TO MISS.
PHOTO CREDIT: HOMEANDDECOR.COM

However, while Dakota Crescent is now eerily quiet, you can still pay a visit to the Dove playground that has years' worth of dust settling between the cracks of the tiles. Take a seat on the tire swing, which is still one of the best feelings ever.

My favourite cake, is the ugly nutella cake.
TIAN KEE & CO., TOOK OVER WHAT WAS ONCE A PROVISION SHOP AND TURNED IT INTO A CAFÉ. 
SADLY, THEY WILL ALSO BE AFFECTED BY THE EN BLOC SCHEME.
PHOTO CREDIT: BURPPLE.COM

Since the area is under the En Bloc scheme, Tian Kee & Co. are counting down their last days at Dakota as well. 

Watching the area undergo renovation will be bittersweet for many, but it's all in the march of progress.

2. Funan DigitaLife Mall

What was once the one-stop shop for all your electronic needs now sits in a dusty pile, after the building closed its doors for the final time on Jun 30.

News about the closure of Singapore's most established electronics hub for redevelopment works until 2019 was shocking, especially for the tenants and long-time customers of the mall.

After Funan mall closed, days were dark because no one knew where to get their lights from anymore
WHAT THE MALL LOOKED LIKE BEFORE IT WAS REDEVELOPED.
PHOTO CREDIT: THE STRAITS TIMES

While you can still pop by Peninsula Plaza, located just across the street, to scratch that electronic-geek itch, it's still not the same as being in Funan.

The mall will be reopened in 2019 as an experimental creative hub, but it will never replace the well-loved Funan DigitaLife Mall many have grown to love and trust.

3. Rochor Centre

Situated in the heart of Bugis, the brightly coloured blocks have been a part of Singapore's history for about 40 years.

Sadly, the colourful estate will be torn down at the end of this year to make way for a new expressway.

The open space at Rochor Centre has served as a backdrop for many Instagram photos, #OOTDs and performances by local music bands, such as Disco Hue, who played an acoustic version of their song 'I'll Be Waiting' on the beautiful rooftop.

Rochor Centre's beauty was a sight taken for granted
WE'RE GOING TO MISS THE BEAUTIFUL COLOURS OF THE BLOCKS.
PHOTO CREDIT: TIME OUT SINGAPORE

Bugis is definitely going to be less vibrant after these blocks are gone.

4. Pearl Centre

Going out with a whimper rather than a bang, Pearl Centre shut down permanently in March this year to make way for the newest addition to the MRT map, the Thomson Line.

What you may not know about Pearl Centre is that it was once home to the Yangtze Cinema, an independent cinema that showed erotic R21 films.

The somewhat awkward posters of Pearl Centre
UP TILL OCTOBER THIS YEAR, YOU COULD STILL CATCH EROTIC FILMS IN PEARL CENTRE.
PHOTO CREDIT: FLICKR.COM/MOMOFU ANDO

From the late 70s, the shopping mall also played host to several levels of night clubs, food stores and other small retail stores, such as tailors.

It's a shame that many of us probably never had the chance to visit the mall to catch peculiar sights like somewhat disturbing movie posters from the 90s and sex parlour advertisements plastered in broad daylight.

Sadly, the mall lost its appeal when cinemas, such as Golden Village and Shaw Theatres, began to pop up, and the management was unable to keep up with the times.

The building used to overlook the busy streets of Chinatown
THIS IS WHAT THE BUILDING LOOKED LIKE IN JANUARY THIS YEAR,
IN THE MIDST OF CONSTRUCTION WORKS.
PHOTO CREDIT: FLICKR.COM/CHOO YUT SHING

2017 might be the year we raise the roof further (all pun intended). Let's spare a moment of silence for the iconic pieces of history we may lose in the next year.

TEASER PHOTO CREDIT: 99.CO
BANNER PHOTO CREDIT: JBABIESDAD.BLOGSPOT.COM

Also in this series:

  1. Five albums that had us shook in 2016
  2. Four shocking political moves
  3. Five totally #WTH moments in 2016
  4. Five trends we're happy to leave behind