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Dream Singapore and Project OSYO empower individuals to take charge of their future.

If you are feeling lost or have unanswered questions about your future, youth-led initiatives Dream Singapore and Project OSYO may be the answer to what you are looking for.

The Dream Singapore team, which is made up of campaign managers Shuying Ke and Ming Kwang Hun, public relations manager MaryAnn Loo and operations manager Leaf Yap, is organising a 30-day campaign to empower individuals to take charge of their own lives.

The passionate team members explained to Youth.SG the purpose of their ground-up initiative, which is into its second year.

Ming Kwang, 23, said: "[The aim is] to get people to see the importance of doing the things that truly matter to them, because if not now, then when? How many more 'tomorrows' do we really have? What if today is the last day of your life?"

Dream Singapore team
LEADING THE DREAM SINGAPORE TEAM (LEFT TO RIGHT), SHUYING, MING KWANG AND MARYANN
WILL HOLD THE SECOND WEEK OF THEIR MONTH-LONG CAMPAIGN AT THE RED BUS.

They are partnering Southeast Asia's first Master Coach, Kelvin Lim, who will be conducting one-on-one life coaching sessions with registrants who range from entrepreneurs to artists.

So, what typically happens during these 15-minute laser coaching sessions?

Shuying explained how the sessions work: "Kelvin will be working with you to get to the heart of what really matters to you, for you to be able to come up with your own solutions, so that you have more ownership and more responsibility."

Ming Kwang recalled how one of their sessions had a lasting impact on two registrants: "There was a couple who met Kelvin when we ran the seven-day event last year. They were about to get divorced. They went for the 15-minute coaching session and managed to resolve what was causing their marriage to be falling apart."

The team members have gone through personal life coaching themselves, and attest to its benefits.

MaryAnn, 30, said: "Through coaching I started to see [that the reason] why I stop is because I think I'm not good enough. I've realised that I've just been living for what I think I'm supposed to be or how I think I'm supposed to behave. That allowed me to actually start questioning a lot of the labels that I put on myself."

Another initiative that strives to help youths find themselves is Project OSYO, which stands for Our Stories, Your Opportunities.

The website was started a year ago by Hui Xiang Chua, 27, who aims to bridge the disconnect between junior college and university curriculum.

Project OSYO HX
RUNNING THE SITE ALONE, HUI XIANG NETWORKS WITH WORKING PROFESSIONALS
FROM VARIED OCCUPATIONS TO SUSTAIN THE SITE'S CONTENT.

Tapping on her alumni networks from Hwa Chong Junior College, Hui Xiang sources stories and experiences from working professionals who have been through undergraduate studies.

These stories' retrospective nature allows pre-university students to be more informed about the courses that are offered in university and if these courses are applicable to the jobs that they eventually want to be employed in.

She said: "We are all working now, so it's more of looking back at our time [in university]. We all wished there could have been more sessions where our seniors could have shared with us what they went through."

OSYO screenshot
AN EXAMPLE OF A STORY POSTED ON THE SITE.
WHAT YOU STUDY IN UNIVERSITY MAY NOT NECESSARILY BE RELATED TO YOUR JOB SCOPE IN THE FUTURE.

In its first year alone, the site collected over 50 stories from working professionals in varied fields.

"There were some who emailed to say it's a great initiative and a number of people have subscribed to the site so I believe it has been helpful to them," mentioned Hui Xiang, thoughtfully.

The main difficulty Hui Xiang faces is sourcing stories to maintain her site. Despite this, however, she still believes in the impact it can have on society.

She said: "It takes less than 10 minutes to fill up the questionnaire and [that 10 minutes] can help to influence people's lives. You can do it anywhere, so it doesn't take up too much of your time. It's an easy way of giving back to society."